say it's not morning

Spring Forecast: Suits, Elementary & Community.
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sarahseeandersen:

I’ll probably just wear T-shirts forever.

When minor characters who are also ethnic minorities start talking among themselves in their native tongues, they sometimes take advantage of their invisibility to say things. Sometimes they break the Fourth Wall and start ranting about the movie director. Sometimes, they spout random obscenities or natter about their lousy lunch. It’s all in not-English, so whatever they say doesn’t matter! And the actual translations of their lines can be a secret source of hilarity in films where actors are instructed to use a Gratuitous Foreign Language (GFL) in order to make a scene sound more authentic. When some Native Americans cast in Westerns were told to speak their own language to add some authenticity, these actors took the opportunity to crudely editorialize about their director, which allegedly resulted in Native American audiences (in)explicably cracking up laughing during scenes that were meant to be dramatic.

Minorities can be marginalized in film, but not silenced. (via salon)

Bonus “so that’s what was going on” from Snowpiercer:

Snowpiercer,” 2014. The native language of this dystopian thriller is French, as it’s based on a graphic novel, “Le Transpercerneige,” 1982, released last year as 설국열차 in South Korea. Directed by Bong Joon-ho, it features Chris Evans as its lead. Despite its French and South Korean origins, the film’s dialogue is mostly English. Writer Emily Yoon saw this film when it was first released in Korea last year, and explains there’s a terrific joke that goes untranslated on two levels: When Curtis (played by Chris Evans) first encounters Namgung Minsu (남궁민수, played by Song Kang-ho), Evans keeps calling him ‘Nam,’ to which Song responds:  “‘남궁’까지가 성이고 ‘민수’ 가 이름이다 이 무식한 새끼야.” (“‘Namgung’ is my surname and ‘Minsu’ is the name, you ignorant bastard.”) Because there are many languages being spoken in the closed universe of the train, the people riding it use an interpreter/translator device. However, the device is stumped because he has a rare two-syllable family name — he should be called either ‘Namgung’ or ‘Minsu,’ but never just ‘Nam.’ The translator machine can’t make sense of this, and so as Song rants, the machine remains silent. So the entire insult goes untranslated for the movie audience as well.

(via seasquared)

In 2009, an exhaustive study published by sociologists at Princeton Uinversity found that when measured on an all-things-being-equal basis, Asian Americans were required to score at least 140 points higher than whites on standardized tests, in order to qualify for admission into top universities.

modest as always

(Source: choxide)

Let’s get things back to normal

(Source: posybrien)

seasquared:

coketalk:

Wait for it.

 

SO NSFW BUT HOLY CRAP THE TWO MINUTE MARK…. JUST SAYIN’…..

See, Rowling largely operates Harry’s generation in a clear system of parallels to the previous generation, Marauders and all. Harry is his father—Quidditch star, a little pig-headed sometimes, an excellent leader. Ron is Sirius Black—snarky and fun, loyal to a fault, mired in self-doubts. Hermione is Remus Lupin—book smart and meticulous, always level-headed, unfailingly perceptive. Ginny is Lily Evans—a firecracker, clever and kind, unwilling to take excuses. Draco Malfoy is Severus Snape—a natural foil to Harry, pretentious, possessed of the frailest ego and also deeper sense of right and wrong when it counts. And guess what? Neville Longbottom is Peter Pettigrew.

Neville is a perfect example of how one single ingredient in the recipe can either ruin your casserole (or stew, or treacle tart, whatever you like), or utterly perfect your whole dish. Neville is the tide-turner, the shiny hinge. And all because he happens to be in the same position as Wormtail… but makes all the hard choices that Pettigrew refused the first time around. Other characters are in similar positions, but none of them go so far as Neville. None of them prove that the shaping of destiny is all on the individual the way he does.

Scarlett [Johansson] is just the most amazing, sweetest girl on the planet. We’ve done several, outside of the Marvel universe, we’ve done some other films together, and I always relish my time with her because she’s always so… She’s way smarter than most people think and an incredibly talented person, and she makes me laugh so much. She’s hilarious. You know, we used to spend time together at like six in the morning because we were in the same make up trailer. It was me and her, her music, her make up people and my guy, and it was the best time of the day for me. x

(Source: forassgard)

It took Adolf Hitler and his Nazi cohorts 12 years to round up and murder 6 million Jews, but their Teutonic cousins, the British, managed to kill almost 4 million Indians in just over a year, with Prime Minister Winston Churchill cheering from the sidelines. Australian biochemist Dr Gideon Polya has called the Bengal Famine a “manmade holocaust” because Churchill’s policies were directly responsible for the disaster. Bengal had a bountiful harvest in 1942, but the British started diverting vast quantities of food grain from India to Britain, contributing to a massive food shortage in the areas comprising present-day West Bengal, Odisha, Bihar and Bangladesh. Author Madhusree Mukerjee tracked down some of the survivors and paints a chilling picture of the effects of hunger and deprivation. In Churchill’s Secret War, she writes: “Parents dumped their starving children into rivers and wells. Many took their lives by throwing themselves in front of trains. Starving people begged for the starchy water in which rice had been boiled. Children ate leaves and vines, yam stems and grass. People were too weak even to cremate their loved ones.”

Remembering India’s Forgotten Holocaust. 

Sarah Waheed notes: “One of the students in my modern South Asia history class a few years ago, was extremely upset that the book we were reading referred to the Bengal famine as a holocaust, calling the author ‘biased’. When I asked him to clarify and elaborate upon what he meant by ‘biased’, he exclaimed, inflamed, “There was only one holocaust!” The rest of the students were, however, more open to the idea of the 20th century being a century of multiple holocausts. The terms ‘holocaust’ and ‘genocide’, however, continue to elicit trauma envy.”

(via mehreenkasana)

I first heard of British crimes like this in Mike Davis’ Late Victorian Holocausts which talks about how imperialism affected the Indian subcontinent’s food supply. The system which could feed everyone, even during hard times, was “centralized” to be “more efficient” by the British administration, leading to skyrocketing poverty and famine and a destroyed local ecology. 

(via jhameia)

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